Dear Members and Garden Friends
For garden fun and garden know-how, wherever you live, please join us in our activities in the upcoming year.

MEETING: Wednesday, December 9, 11:00 AM
Dunwoody Library, Williams Room

PROGRAM: Holiday Luncheon (No Program)

December is a time for our gardens and us gardeners to rest, spend time with family and friends, and express gratitude for our many blessings. This month we will have our popular cov- ered dish luncheon where we can enjoy great food and the wonderful friendships within our group.
As in prior years, we will participate in a charity event for this holiday season, providing clothes, toys and rolling suit- cases to the Atlanta Day Shelter for Women and Children

for more info contact

"Flowers seem intended for a solace of ordinary humanity."
- John Ruskin

Building the edgeworthia flowers for February

"From December to March, there are for many of us three gardens -
the garden outdoors,
the garden of pots and bowls in the house,
and the garden of the mind's eye."
- Katherine S. White

DeKalb Federation of Garden Clubs

Check out the calendar of the Garden Club of Georgia for new and interesting events

The News of Redbud District

Walter Reeves page for
Gardening Events around town for December

Please check out "Gail the Gardener" column on the Redbud website. Go to and click on Education, then Gail the Gardener. Also Renee Hopf has a very nice Birds and Bees page. Lots of good info on this site.

"I heard a bird sing
In the dark of December
A magical thing
And sweet to remember.

'We are nearer to Spring
Than we were in September,'
I heard a bird sing
In the dark of December."
- Oliver Herford, I Heard a Bird Sing

Lime colored in the summer and burgandy in the fall - Nice!

"I heard the bells on Christmas Day
Their old, familiar carols play,
And wild and sweet the words repeat
Of peace on earth, good-will to men!"
- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

"Yule, is when the dark half of the year relinquishes to the light half. Starting the next morning at sunrise, the sun climbs just a little higher and stays a little longer in the sky each day. Known as Solstice Night, or the longest night of the year, much celebration was to be had as the ancestors awaited the rebirth of the Oak King, the Sun King, the Giver of Life that warmed the frozen Earth and made her to bear forth from seeds protected through the fall and winter in her womb. Bonfires were lit in the fields, and crops and trees were "wassailed" with toasts of spiced cider."
- Yule Lore

For more information, contact:

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