Be sure to check out the FLYER and the TICKET forms for the new Dunwoody Garden Club's 40th annual card party, luncheon, fashion show, and silent auction on Tuesday, February 21st. It will be held at the same location as in recent years, the Fellowship Hall at Dunwoody United Methodist Church, 1548 Mount Vernon Rd, from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.

Dear Members and Garden Friends
For garden fun and garden know-how, wherever you live, please join us in our activities in the upcoming year.

January 11, 2017
“Container Gardening”
Lisa Bartlett, Gramma B’s Home and Garden

Coffee and Refreshments 9:30-10:00
Meeting 10:00-11:00

North DeKalb Cultural Center, Room 4
5339 Chamblee-Dunwoody Road
(next to the Dunwoody Library)

for more info contact Rose@DunwoodyGardenClub.com

There are two seasonal diversions that can ease the bite of any winter.
One is the January thaw. The other is the seed catalogues.
Hal Borland

DeKalb Federation of Garden Clubs
www.dekalbfederation.com


Check out the calendar of the Garden Club of Georgia for new and interesting events

The News of Redbud District

Walter Reeves page for
Gardening Events around town for January

Please check out "Gail the Gardener" column on the Redbud website. Go to www.RedbudDistrict.com and click on Education, then Gail the Gardener. Also Renee Hopf has a very nice Birds and Bees page. Lots of good info on this site.

The twelve months...
Snowy, Flowy, Blowy,
Showery, Flowery, Bowery,
Hoppy, Croppy, Droppy,
Breezey, Sneezy, Freezy.
George Ellis

Bare branches of each tree
on this chilly January morn
look so cold so forlorn.
Gray skies dip ever so low
left from yesterday's dusting of snow.
Yet in the heart of each tree
waiting for each who wait to see
new life as warm sun and breeze will blow,
like magic, unlock springs sap to flow,
buds, new leaves, then blooms will grow.
Nelda Hartmann, January Morn

"January is the quietest month in the garden.  ...  But just because it looks quiet doesn't mean that nothing is happening. The soil, open to the sky, absorbs the pure rainfall while microorganisms convert tilled-under fodder into usable nutrients for the next crop of plants.  The feasting earthworms tunnel along, aerating the soil and preparing it to welcome the seeds and bare roots to come." Rosalie Muller Wright

For more information, contact: rose@DunwoodyGardenClub.com

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